Getting ready for surgery in nine days

Okay,

I got the shorts and large T-shirt required for the walking after surgery in the hospital. I have the meds for pain when I return home. All the folks are lined up to help me for the first week.

I was asked to have a coach show up with me for the class this week, and also early in the day before I  go home. Also, someone was asked to wait in the hospital for the results of my surgery.

I have done neither of these. I cannot ask anyone to spend so much time, when I’m certain to be able to do all that is required of me when I’m in the hospital.

The results of my surgery will be given by called in to my son, and  he can take it from there.

I’m eager to get on with the operation, the recuperation, and the other knee as soon as possible.

I have my helpers lined up for post surgery

It’s important after knee replacement surgery to have folks help around the house and to help you get around safely.

I’ve been lining up my helpers.

My cousin will pick me up from the hospital and stay with me for a few days.

My son is taking me to the hospital on the day of surgery.

Another two sons are coming, one overnight, and both will help me around the house, and cook for me.

I’m going to get used to being spoiled.

Getting my knee replaced

Dr. Sah at Dearborn-Sah Center for Joint Replacement has prepared me to get a better knee. On June 2, I’ll have one knee made new again, and six weeks later the other one.

I took in a class today where the organized staff gave me all the information I’ll new for pre-op and post-op. I haven’t been this ready for a new adventure in a few years. I’m looking forward to be free of pain, and ability to walk better. There are places to go and things to do.

 

 

Unexpected Encounters

My book, Unexpected Encounters, chronicles my adventure into 19 countries, including the Arctic Circle and the Sahara desert.

Some folks seem to think, at the age of 74, it was a big, brave, challenge for me. I, on the other hand, didn’t think my age had anything to do with the year long journey.

I’m just an adventurous person, but I did find toting suitcases, computer, camera and bags a challenge for my weakened muscles, earned from sitting in front of a computer for many years as a reporter.

But, if I can do it, you can do it, no matter the age.

My book is getting edited

The book that chronicles my yearlong journey is getting edited by an exceptional person. She is detail oriented and I’m happy to hear it’s going well.

She thinks it will be a best seller. I sure hope so.

A bread head

A bread head in Turkey

Hosteling mixed blessings

You can save some money while traveling, by staying in a hostel.

However, there’s a range of quality from a D minus to an A. While on my one year journey, there were some hostels catering to people younger than myself. That created some problems, when I went to sleep around 10 – 11 p.m. and they’d stager into the room around 3 a.m. and they were not silent.

Noise, limited showers for the number of people using them, no choice as to who you room with, bad lighting and non-caring folks at the reception area, were norms for the D minus hostels.

But there were good hostels too. Those were run by folks who catered to the guests’ comfort.

So, unless you do your homework ahead of your stay, be prepared for whatever you find. It may be a D or somewhat in-between the worst and the best. Good luck.

Traveling to Cuba

It’s easy to travel to Cuba today, since President Barack Obama changed a long held policy that limited the U.S. citizens to visit the island.

I did when living in Costa Rica, and loved the week I spent there.

I rented a hotel room, that was a converted house across the road from the ocean.

The home was once a prestigious house, with marble steps, filled with expensive furniture. I paid $25 a night.

If you want to see Cuba, you should do it before it changes and becomes a tourist trap.

Schengen rules – keep them in mind

If you plan on staying in any country that applies the strict schengen rules, then you must be aware of those rules. If you go over the 90 day allowance in any schengen rule country, then you face a $10,00 fine and/or deportation.

Most every European country will hold a tourist/visitor to those rules. So if you plan on staying longer, you must leave the shengen country for 90 days before entering the country again.

The United Kingdom does not hold a tourist/visitor accountable for the 90 day rule, however, those countries have their own visa rules.

What I’m saying is to study the rules, and know before you go. Since security has gotten tighter, custom agents, as a rule, look carefully at passports and can assess how long you stayed in the country.

 

 

What I learned when traveling for one year

On the road for one year, on planes, buses, trains, boats, ferries, camels, horses, with luggage, purse, camera, and computer, I learned that most people are good.

It’s easier to find the good folks than the bad ones, that is if your open to that possibility.

Everywhere I went, someone was always there to help me off of a train, pick up my luggage and/or walk with me to my next place.

It doesn’t matter if you don’t speak the language, always try English first. If that doesn’t work, try pantomime, point to a map, write it out. MOst people will find that fun and charming and will work harder at trying to help you.

Learn how to ask where is…, thank you, hello and goodbye in the language of the country where you are, even if just for a few hours or an extended time.

Have fun and that will beam out of you.

Traveling with minimum luggage

First of all, for minimum fuss, you must keep your clothing options down to a manageable size. This is something I try to do every time I go somewhere, and every time I come back with something I didn’t wear. But I will not give up.

I almost have it down to a science, but not quite. When I traveled for a whole year, there were seasons to take into consideration. But since I traveled alone, with only myself to haul my baggage around, I had to be ruthless with what I left behind. Once when my raincoat didn’t keep me warm in Iceland, t purchased a sweater, and then I had to let go of something else to accommodate the extra bulk. Oh, and I lost weight, so some items because of that, got left behind, as well. I’m known for leaving items on park benches and airports.

Then there are those great plastic bags that will shrink clothing by using a vacuum sweeper hose to suck the air out. That will give you more space.

But, one more reason to keep your luggage down to minimum is the airlines weight regulations. It’s very costly to go over the limit.

You must check all the airlines you’ll be traveling on for those rules; and believe me they differ between airline companies. It can get tricky, so get prepared.